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Easy Buckwheat Muffins (Gluten Free and Dairy Free)

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Whenever I begin getting groans over too many days of scrambled eggs in a row, I know it’s time for something different for breakfast. These simple and delicious buckwheat muffins are a family favorite for just this occasion. They are gluten and grain free, filled with protein and healthy fats, and naturally sweetened. Let’s dive into how you can make these buckwheat muffins and all the reasons why you would want to!

A Perfect Way to Start the Day Off Right

We are huge proponents of nutrient dense and real foods for all the meals we eat. But, there’s extra effort to make sure we serve a nutritious breakfast filled with protein, healthy fats, and carbs. 

gluten free buckwheat muffins

Most “breakfast” foods marketed toward kids are not much more than sugary carbs filled with many unwanted ingredients and lacking in protein and healthy fats. Because of this, we make an extra effort to teach and model the importance of a well-balanced, nutrient dense breakfast. This is hugely helpful to start the day off right and keep little bellies and growing brains satisfied!

Buckwheat – A New Favorite

Honestly, until a few years ago, I had never even heard of buckwheat flour. When we began our real food journey, we began experimenting with all sorts of gluten and grain free flours, fermenting grains and sourdough. Somewhere along the way, we were introduced to buckwheat flour when a friend dropped off an extra bag that she had.

gluten free blueberry buckwheat muffins

I had heard of buckwheat pancakes so we tried those first and were big fans. Then, we wanted to explore more of what this nutritious flour had to offer. More experimenting occurred and these buckwheat muffins became another family favorite.

What is Buckwheat Flour?

While it sounds like it should be closely related to standard wheat flour, buckwheat flour is actually completely different and considered a pseudocereal. It is the ground version of buckwheat which is not a grain at all but actually a fruit closely related to wild rhubarb.

Buckwheat grows easily, even in harsh conditions. It also has a robust nutrient profile. For these reasons, it has become popular to grow around the world. Once the plant has matured and dried, the inner fruit is what is ground and turned into flour. Depending on how much of the dark hull is left on will determine whether the flour is light colored or speckled with dark flecks. 

ground buckwheat flour

Nutritional Benefits of Buckwheat Flour

Buckwheat flour offers more nutrients than most standard grains. While buckwheat is not known for being particularly high in vitamins, it is rich in minerals: manganese, copper, magnesium, iron, phosphorus. Also, as compared to most seeds and grains, buckwheat is low in phytic acid which blocks the absorption of vitamins and minerals. This means that the abundant minerals present in buckwheat flour are more easily absorbed.

Buckwheat is also particularly high in health promoting antioxidants and fiber. There are two main varieties of buckwheat: Tartary Buckwheat and Common Buckwheat. When it comes to nutritional benefits, Tartary Buckwheat surpasses common buckwheat handily. 

organic buckwheat flour with the hull

How to Use Buckwheat

Depending on where you are in the world, buckwheat has varied uses. It is commonly made into soba noodles in Japan. In many places around the world buckwheat is turned into pancakes or blinis. Galettes, yeast rolls, and other uses in baked goods are standard uses for buckwheat flour.

Buckwheat Muffin Ingredients

Buckwheat flour is commonly used in combination with wheat flour to help give it an appealing taste and texture. However, for those avoiding gluten, there are common ways to pair alternative flours with buckwheat and still have a delicious result. These buckwheat muffins pair buckwheat flour with almond flour for a hearty and delicious muffin.

Buckwheat Flour: For a common buckwheat flour, our favorite source is from Janie’s mill. If you are looking for the extra nutritious Tartary Buckwheat flour, this is a great option.

Almond Flour: Another grain free flour made from ground almonds adds some protein and extra nutrition to these muffins. The almond flour works really well with the buckwheat flour to give the muffins 

The other ingredients you’ll need to make these buckwheat muffins are: coconut oil, baking powder, salt, maple syrup or honey, eggs, and fresh or frozen blueberries.

Buckwheat Muffins: Frequently Asked Questions

How do you serve buckwheat muffins?

We generally serve these muffins alongside yogurt and hard-boiled eggs for an easy breakfast. But the options are endless. They’d go perfectly with a complete brunch with friends or family or can be used as a quick breakfast or snack on-the-go. For an extra special treat, we like to make a quick frosting of our cultured cream with a drizzle of honey or maple syrup.

buckwheat muffins in silicone muffine cups

Can you freeze buckwheat muffins?

Yes! These freeze and thaw perfectly. To thaw just set out on the counter a few hours before serving or warm in a hot oven until thawed. In fact, I always try to make at least a double or triple batch of these muffins whenever we are making them to have extra for the freezer.

Can you substitute other flours?

If you are not concerned about gluten, you could substitute a wheat or all-purpose flour for the almond flour in this buckwheat muffin recipe.

Buckwheat Muffin Recipe

Yield: 12 Muffins

Ingredients:

1 cup buckwheat flour
1 cup almond flour
1/3 cup of melted coconut oil
3 eggs
1/3 cup of honey or maple syrup
1/3 cup water
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries

Directions: 

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease muffin tin or use silicone muffin cups.

2. Mix buckwheat flour, almond flour, baking powder, and salt.

3. Add coconut oil, honey or maple syrup, water, and eggs. Mix wet ingredients into dry ingredients.

4. Mix in fresh or frozen berries.

5. Spoon muffin mixture into muffin cups until the cups are roughly 2/3 full.

6. Bake at 350 for 18-20 minutes.

Enjoy!


For more of our favorite gluten free breakfast recipes check out our:

Soaked and Baked Oatmeal
Gluten and Nut Free Granola
Butternut Squash Muffins
Potato Crusted Quiche

Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means we earn a small commission on qualifying purchases at no cost to you. We are so appreciative of your support!

gluten free buckwheat muffin recipe

Easy Buckwheat Muffins (Gluten Free and Dairy Free)

Yield: 12 muffins
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 18 minutes
Total Time: 28 minutes

Whenever I begin getting groans over too many days of scrambled eggs in a row, I know it’s time for something different for breakfast. These simple and delicious buckwheat muffins are a family favorite for just this occasion. They are gluten and grain free, filled with protein and healthy fats, and naturally sweetened. Let’s dive into how you can make these buckwheat muffins and all the reasons why you would want to!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup buckwheat flour

  • 1 cup almond flour

  • 1/3 cup of melted coconut oil
  • 
3 eggs
  • 
1/3 cup of honey or maple syrup
  • 
1/3 cup water
  • 
1 tsp baking powder
  • 
½ tsp salt

  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries

Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease muffin tin or use silicone muffin cups.

    2. Mix buckwheat flour, almond flour, baking powder, and salt.

    3. Add coconut oil, honey or maple syrup, water, and eggs. Mix wet ingredients into dry ingredients.

    4. Mix in fresh or frozen berries.

    5. Spoon muffin mixture into muffin cups until the cups are roughly 2/3 full.

    6. Bake at 350 for 18-20 minutes.

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8 Comments

  1. I just made these buckwheat muffins, and my husband and I love them! It’s so difficult to find gluten-free goodies that have a decent texture and flavor profile, but these tasty treats are it! We appreciate your recipes and look forward to trying your cheese recipes soon as well.

  2. Have you tried soaking the almond flour and buckwheat flour together in whey or something prior to baking? I’d like to neutralize some of that physic acid without the texture of the muffins being too compromised.

    1. Great question! I haven’t tried this. Buckwheat itself is pretty low in phytic acid and the nutrients are more easily absorbed than other flours. You could for sure soak and dry the almonds and then turn into a flour or meal and use but I’m not sure about soaking them and then making the batter. Let me know if you try it!

    2. I would soak the grain separate from the nuts
      The nuts need to soaked in salt water anyway, not acidified water. Then dehydrate and put in food processor to make the almond meal.
      Actually there’s not enough water or milk in this to soak the grain.

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