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Fudgy Pumpkin Buckwheat Brownies (Gluten Free)

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These fudgy pumpkin buckwheat brownies have it all! They are nutritious and gluten-free, yet still taste delicious with a dense brownie texture.

Buckwheat Brownies – A Staple in Our Home

We are in the thick of it at our house. Joelle is recovering from a broken leg and the birth of our new baby all happening in the last few weeks! That being said, we haven’t been doing a lot of cooking and have been incredibly grateful for tons of friends and family dropping off so many meals for our family. 

healthy pumpkin buckwheat brownies recipe

But, one of the few things that has remained stocked in our fridge, even in the midst of the crazy last few weeks has been these delicious pumpkin buckwheat brownies.

We love them because they:

  • Come together in just a few minutes but make a large pan to last us several days!
  • Pack in way more nutrients than your standard brownie.
  • Are made with naturally gluten-free and grain free buckwheat flour.
  • Satisfy any sweet tooth.
9x13 pan of homemade buckwheat brownies

Buckwheat – A New Favorite

Honestly, until a few years ago, I had never even heard of buckwheat flour.

When we began our real food journey, we began experimenting with all sorts of gluten and grain free flours, fermenting grains, and sourdough. Somewhere along the way, we were introduced to buckwheat flour when a friend dropped off an extra bag that she had.

I had heard of buckwheat pancakes. So, we tried those first and were big fans!

Then, we wanted to explore more of what this nutritious flour had to offer. More experimenting occurred and these buckwheat muffins became another family favorite with these pumpkin buckwheat brownies following close behind.

gluten free buckwheat muffins

What is Buckwheat Flour?

While it sounds like it should be closely related to standard wheat flour, buckwheat flour is actually completely different and considered a pseudocereal. It is the ground version of buckwheat which is not a grain at all but actually a fruit closely related to wild rhubarb.

Buckwheat grows easily, even in harsh conditions. It also has a robust nutrient profile. For these reasons, it has become popular to grow around the world. 

Once the plant has matured and dried, the inner fruit is what is ground and turned into flour. Depending on how much of the dark hull is left on will determine whether the flour is light colored or speckled with dark flecks. 

Nutritional Benefits of Buckwheat Flour

Buckwheat flour offers more nutrients than most standard grains. While buckwheat is not known for being particularly high in vitamins, it is rich in minerals: manganese, copper, magnesium, iron, phosphorus. 

Also, as compared to most seeds and grains, buckwheat is low in phytic acid which blocks the absorption of vitamins and minerals. This means that the abundant minerals present in buckwheat flour are more easily absorbed.

Buckwheat is also particularly high in health promoting antioxidants and fiber. 

tartary buckwheat flour for fudgy brownies

There are two main varieties of buckwheat: Tartary Buckwheat and Common Buckwheat. When it comes to nutritional benefits, Tartary Buckwheat surpasses common buckwheat handily.

Another benefit of buckwheat is that it’s heat safe and perfect to bake with. Instead of losing nutrients when it is cooked, buckwheat actually increases the nutrient values that it provides when heated.

How to Use Buckwheat

Depending on where you are in the world, buckwheat has varied uses. It is commonly made into soba noodles in Japan. In many places around the world buckwheat is turned into pancakes or blinis. Galettes, yeast rolls, and other uses in baked goods are standard uses for buckwheat flour.

How to Store Buckwheat Flour

As with other flours, it is best to store buckwheat in the freezer to preserve freshness and retain nutrients.

Ingredients in Pumpkin Buckwheat Brownies:

Buckwheat flour

Our favorite sources of buckwheat flour are either this common buckwheat flour from Janie’s Mill or for a more nutrient dense splurge, this Himalayan Tartary Buckwheat is a great option!

pumpkin buckwheat browny ingredients

Cocoa Powder (or cacao powder)

Either cocoa or cacao powder can be used in this recipe. Cacao is the raw and unprocessed form of chocolate. Cocoa powder is the heated form of cacao that is much more standard on grocery store shelves. While cocoa powder is inferior in nutrients to cacao powder, it still retains antioxidants despite its heating. When buying cocoa powder, be sure to look for a product with cocoa powder being the only ingredient as mixes often contain added sugar. Dutch-processed cocoa powder is a cocoa powder that has been treated with an alkalized solution making it less acidic and richer in taste than regular cocoa powder.

Brown Sugar

Alternatively coconut sugar can be used in place of brown sugar if preferred. We generally source organic brown sugar at Costco.

Pumpkin Puree

We substitute butternut squash puree for pumpkin puree in this recipe and it works perfectly. You can learn how to make your own butternut squash puree in our post—How To Roast Butternut Squash Two Ways.

how to roast butternut squash and make puree

Eggs

Dense, fudgy brownies are preferred to cake like brownies in our house so we’ve found that 2 eggs is the perfect amount for this recipe.

Milk

We use whole, raw milk but any milk or dairy milk alternative will work.

Chocolate Chips

Semi-sweet chocolate chips are our favorite but dark or milk would work too! Save a few extra for sprinkling over the top of your brownies.

Baking Powder

Always look for aluminum-free baking powder. Bob’s Red Mill is our favorite brand. Or you can make your own using this baking powder recipe.

Salt

A bit of sea salt compliments chocolate perfectly. Redmond Real Salt is our go to favorite.

Pumpkin Buckwheat Brownies Recipe

Ingredients:

1 Cup Buckwheat Flour
1 Cup Cocoa Powder (or cacao powder)
1 Cup Brown Sugar (or coconut sugar)
2 tsp Baking Powder
½ tsp Salt
2 Eggs
2 Cups Pumpkin Puree (or butternut squash puree)
1 Cup Milk
1 Cup Chocolate Chips

pumpkin buckwheat brownies in 9x13 pan

Directions:

1. Mix dry ingredients (buckwheat flour, cocoa powder, brown sugar, baking powder and salt).

2. Add wet ingredients (eggs, pumpkin puree, and milk) and mix thoroughly.

3. Stir in chocolate chips, reserving a few for sprinkling over the top if desired.

4. Pour into greased 9×13 baking pan. Sprinkle with additional chocolate chips if desired.

5. Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes until cooked through.

Notes:

We store these brownies in the fridge for up to 5 days. They also freeze very well.

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Similar Recipes:

dense fudgy buckwheat brownies

Fudgy Pumpkin Buckwheat Brownies

Yield: 9x13 pan
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Buckwheat Flour

  • 1 Cup Cocoa Powder (or cacao powder)

  • 1 Cup Brown Sugar (or coconut sugar)

  • 2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 
½ tsp Salt

  • 2 Eggs
  • 
2 Cups Pumpkin Puree (or butternut squash puree)
  • 
1 Cup Milk

  • 1 Cup Chocolate Chips

Instructions

    1. Mix dry ingredients (buckwheat flour, cocoa powder, brown sugar, baking powder and salt).
    2. Add wet ingredients (eggs, pumpkin puree, and milk) and mix thoroughly.
    3. Stir in chocolate chips, reserving a few for sprinkling over the top if desired.
    4. Pour into greased 9x13 baking pan. Sprinkle with additional chocolate chips if desired.
    5. Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes until cooked through.

Notes

We store these brownies in the fridge for up to 5 days. They also freeze very well.

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6 Comments

  1. Hey, I tried your brownies. I used the leftover squash we had for our Easter dinner. It wasn’t enough so I added the pumpkin to make 2 cups. Also I added raises and walnuts. It turned out great! Oh so moist, flovorable. Thanks for sharing, it has become one of my favorites.
    Your friend in Michigan,
    Sharon Nichols.

  2. I just made these because I happened to have all the ingredients and needed to use up the final Buttercup Squash from last fall’s harvest. These were very easy to make and taste delicious. I left out the chocolate chips because I prefer plain brownies. I’ll be sharing these with my GF friends.

  3. Yet another happy brownie baker over here! Was craving brownies to go alongside our fresh batch of raw goat ice cream, and whipped these up using our excess of squash purée, adding in sprouted pumpkin seeds and coconut and they were so delicious! A winner for the whole family, thanks for sharing!

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